Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Why You Should Be Bivocational.

Don't miss this post about bivocational pastors/church planters. Dr. Terry Dorsett builds an excellent case for bivocational pastors.

7 comments:

David Wilson said...

Working on it, but already seeing that it's a strategy that church people used to a full time pastor have some trouble with.

And so do I.

Then too, if you are looking for a place of service, you now have eliminated most of them - or at least most that aren't family-run or rural or both. That's what I am finding out the hard way.

I think it's a good planting strategy but for established churches it isn't all that great unless you have the right congregation who wants to see everyone in the community on mission.

Anonymous said...

When someone who is a paid director of missions (even part time!) and a pastor the rest of the time calls themselves "bivocational" it sounds like a joke to me. At least get a job at Starbucks to call yourself "bivocational".

Dr. Terry Dorsett said...

David,
Thanks for your great insights. I agree that in an established church it is quite a transition to move from a fully-funded pastor to a bivocational pastor. The leadership must be trained in how to work as a team with the pastor. This is why I wrote the book, Developing Leadership Teams in the Bivocational Church, published by CrossBooks (a division of Lifeway). You can pick up a copy of the book on Amazon. I believe it will help you overcome some of the issues you have mentioned.

Dr. Terry W. Dorsett

Les Puryear said...

David,

I am told that the largest contingent of pastors in the SBC are bivocational pastors. If that is true, then that means that the largest group of churches in the SBC hire bivocational pastors. Seems like there should be plenty of vacancies.

Anonymous,

I can't tell if your comment is serious or "tongue in cheek." I'm going to assume you are serious, thus my answer to you is that the term "bivocational" means two sources of income. Any other presuppositions are superfluous.

Dr. Terry,

Thanks for your article. It really struck a chord with me as a bivocational pastor. Keep up the good work.

Les

David Wilson said...

Les,

I don't do family run or rural churches. I don't care to invest my life in churches that care more about their buildings than they do the lost. I check several church staffing sites regularly and the bivo churches on there almost without fail are small struggling rural churches.

If you hear of a contemporary, missional, urban or exburb church that needs a bivo pastor I'd love to know about it.

I think we ought to be planting multi-staff bivo churches in urban areas with the staff taking jobs like teaching or other community center positions. But then I've thought that for years. :)

David

Les Puryear said...

David,

I hear you, man. That is exactly what we are doing at our new church plant.

I'm not sure you're going to find what you are seeking unless you plant it that way. :)

Blessings,

Les

Dr. Terry Dorsett said...

Les,
I think your advice to Dave is right on target. Few churches can transition in a healthy way so he is most likely going to have to start a new one to completely fulfill God's calling for his life. I wish that was not the case, as so many existing churches need his kind of thinking in their leadership circles. But it is hard for any of us to overcome our traditions. I'm taking time right now to pray for Dave to find that perfect place to serve, sounds like he has much to offer.

Terry